Final EPA rule doubles Navistar’s Nonconformance Penalties

Christopher Goodfellow - 5 September 2012

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released a Final Rule setting the penalty Navistar must pay for non-EPA 2010 compliant engines at $3,775, almost double the level in the Interim Rule.

In a statement Troy Clarke, Navistar's recently appointed President and Chief Operating Officer, said: "We are pleased that the EPA has issued the Final Rule for Nonconformance Penalties (NCPs) for on-highway heavy-duty diesel engines. We can now provide our dealers and customers with clarity and certainty as we transition to our clean engine technology and look forward to utilizing the Final Rule as needed."

The Final Rule establishes the level of NCPs a manufacturer must pay for an engine which does not meet the 2010 NOx emissions limits for heavy-duty vehicles. At present, Navistar is the only manufacture to seek certification for an engine family using NCPs.

"Under the final penalty regulations, a nonconforming manufacturer with engines at the upper NOx limit of 0.50 g/bhp-hr would pay a penalty of $3,775 for each model year 2012 engine it produces. Manufacturers would pay a lesser penalty if the NOx emissions of the engine are lower. For example, the penalty for a 2012 engine with NOx emissions at 0.30 g/bhp-hr would be $1,259," said the EPA, adding that the increase on the proposed penalty was due to information received during the comment period.

At this point, the EPA has not taken a final action in regards to medium-duty engines.

Daniel Ustian, Navistar's former President and Chief Operating Officer, announced his retirement with immediate effect last Monday.

You may also be interested in

OEMs comment on downsizing of Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) tanks and EPA regulation of refill intervals

Niels Tholen - 25 November 2014

Downsizing of Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) tanks and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s regulation of DEF refill intervals for passenger cars was discussed at the 7th Integer Emissions Summit USA 2014, held in Chicago, IL. Mike Shovel, Thermal Management - Technical Specialist SCR at Navistar, discussed that the post-2017 greenhouse...

Navistar begins shipments of its first vocational vehicles with Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) engines

Ben Treadwell - 17 July 2014

Navistar Inc. has announced that it has shipped the first of its Durastar and International Workstar vehicles using 9L and 10L engines with Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology. The engines will be used in a variety of vocational vehicles including garbage packing and utility trucks, dump trucks and sewer pumpers. Navistar said...

Navistar completes heavy-duty product transition to Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR)

Niels Tholen - 13 November 2013

With the launch of the International LoneStar on-highway truck, Navistar has now completed the conversion of its entire model range to using Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology. The LoneStar is equipped with a Cummins ISX15 engine and SCR technology and was the last of Navistar's heavy-duty truck models to be converted since...

Navistar and Cummins reach 10,000 orders milestone for International Trucks range

Niels Tholen - 23 August 2013

Navistar and Cummins have reached the milestone of 10,000 orders for trucks from the International Trucks range with Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology. The range includes Cummins ISX15 engines and SCR technology instead of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) after Navistar launched its transition to SCR-based technology with the...

Navistar launches new heavy-duty TranStar model with Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR)

Niels Tholen - 19 August 2013

Navistar has announced the launch its new heavy-duty International TranStar truck model. The truck is designed for regional hauling activity and comes equipped with a MAxxForce 13 engine as well as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology. It is the company's fifth heavy-duty truck model to adopt SCR technology since December...

How much did Navistar’s competitors think should be paid for non-EPA 2010 compliant engines?

Christopher Goodfellow - 5 September 2012

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has published its responses to manufacturers' comments on Nonconformance Penalties (NCPs) for heavy-duty diesel engines which do not meet 2010 emissions standards. Highlights from the EPA's Response to Comments document, published in August, are included below: PACCAR commented that in...